Hackamore History
placeholder image

The Moors and the Hackma

The use of a Hackamore can be traced back to 711 AD when the Moors invaded Spain across the Straits of Gibraltar. At that time, it was just a simple twist of rawhide around the muzzle of the horse. It was called the Hackma and the reins came from the side much the same as what we would call a side pull bridle of today. The Moors also rode with a shorter stirrup so they could stand in the saddle to throw a spear or shoot a bow. This Style of riding much like English riding was known as Lagente.
placeholder image

The Serreta

In Spain the Hackma was developed into a medal piece of equipment named the Serreta. This worked on the bridge of the horses nose and it had a serrated surface. A trainer using this piece of equipment would drive the horse into the Serreta causing extreme collection. The reins came off the top of the nose and promoted a high head carriage. The Spanish also rode with a longer stirrup and sat deeper in the saddle much like when Knights would joust. Riding this way was known as LaBrida. This style of riding worked well in Spain while working cattle because they used poles and pens to control their cattle. This is where the term cowpoke originated.
placeholder image

The Peruvian Bosal

When the Spanish brought their horses to the new world they were still using the Serreta to train their horses. As more Spanish and horses arrived medal became scarce. As a result, the Serreta evolved into a braided rawhide piece of equipment known as the Jaquima. As with the Serreta the reins came off of the top of the nosepiece, much like what is used by the traditional Peruvian Paso horse trainers of today.

The Vaquero

As the Spanish colonized the new world, they also started large cattle operations. In the large expanses of grazing land, they did not have the pens and chutes to control the cattle as they did in Spain. This is when the new breed of cattlemen, known as the vaquero developed the techniques of roping cattle. The Vaquero started many of the styles and techniques associated with the cowboy of today.
placeholder image
placeholder image

The Hackamore, Bosal, Bosalito and Spoon Spade Bit

A horse with a high head carriage got in the way of roping. So according to “Chief Rochas the Vaquero” it was around Sonora that the Jaquima evolved again into the modern day Hackamore. By having the reins come from under the chin it promotes a lower head carriage. This keeps the horses head out of the way while roping. The Vaqueros went on to develop the technique of using the Hackamore, Bosal, Bosalito and Spoon Spade Bit to train some of the best stock horses in the world.
placeholder image